Bongo Net System

Description

The Bongo Paired Plankton Net System, Series 1200 is a sophisticated sampling device that is capable of multiple-unit, simultaneous sampling at mid-ocean depths as well as a reliable single-unit tow platform for use in shallow water sampling. One of the unique features of the Bongo system is its opening and closing mechanism that allows discrete “known-depth” sampling. The system has no frontal obstructions to frighten, disturb, or damage the catch and is large enough to filter water at the rate of 47.5m3/minute when towing at a speed of two knots.

A bongo net consists of two plankton nets mounted next to each other. These plankton nets are ring nets with a small mesh width and a long funnel shape. Both nets are enclosed by a cod-end that is used for collecting plankton. The bongo net is pulled horizontally through the water column by a research vessel. Using a bongo net, a scientist can work with two different mesh widths simultaneously.

Because of the Bongo’s simple design and rugged construction, the unit is almost maintenance free.

We manufacture the 1200 series Bongo net system in several sizes. The only difference in the models is frame size or hoop diameter, measured in centimeters. When requesting a quotation for a Bongo system, please indicate the diameter and net mesh that you prefer, along with the filtration ratio of the nets. When you purchase a complete Bongo system, all nets, doors and cod ends are rigged and tested prior to shipment to ensure proper operation.

Specifications

Aluminum Construction

Two rings, connected by a coupling with a rotatable connection point for the towing rope, are equipped with two 2.5-meter-long net bags

Available in 60, 70 or 80 cm diameters

Category Description

Plankton Samplers provide marine biologists with a fully automated tool to collect plankton in the oceans, enabling analysis of plankton species distribution and abundance. Plankton sampling provides invaluable insights into numerous aspects of plankton dynamics and ecology including:

  • climate change
  • biodiversity and biogeography
  • eutrophication
  • harmful algal blooms
  • fisheries investigations
  • plankton ecology
  • taxonomy
  • regime shifts
  • non-indigenous species.